Protecting your IT equipment from weather events

Protecting your IT equipment from weather events

Given the recent spate of storm events, and the weather experts saying we’re going to get more in the future, now is the time to check your IT gear is protected from weather events.

New research from NIWA (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research) has shown that extreme events have occurred four to five times more frequently in the last decade.

Many IT technicians had call-outs from clients after the recent storms. Thunderstorms can literally fry electronics, and this causes not just replacement cost, but also work disruption and even possibly data loss.

Many technicians carry surge protectors in their cars, so that whenever they are working, they can ensure that sensitive IT equipment is at least surge protected. But for clients we see less often, or who are not on a managed service agreement, it’s easy for IT devices to not be surge protected. Your staff, cleaners or others will sometimes move plugs about. Be aware that this does matter.

Now is a good time to have a look at your computer equipment, or ask your IT Alliance partner to do it for you next time they are onsite.

Here are our top tips to protect your IT – how do you stack up?

Surge protectors

A surge protector guards against the damage that sudden power surges can cause.

  • It’s recommended for almost any piece of IT hardware plugged into a power outlet.

  • It will help protect against power spikes which can sometimes happen, especially if the power suddenly goes off. This happens more often than you might think; for example, your local lines company may be doing maintenance or upgrades to their system and will turn the power off for a period overnight.

  • The surge protectors can protect against more distant lightning strikes but will not provide protection from a close or direct strike.

  • Surge protectors can be built into power boards, so several devices can be plugged into them.

  • Do NOT plug anything other than IT equipment into surge protectors / surge protected power boards. We have seen heaters plugged in to surge protectors! These types of devices can fry your electronics. Make sure non-IT gear uses a separate power point.


  • Things that people often forget to surge protect

  • The Optical Network Terminal (ONT) that brings your fibre internet into your premises. The ONT is the little box that your provider installs The ONT is the little box that Chorus installs (Wellington region, can be a different company elsewhere in NZ). If the ONT blows up, you will have no fibre Internet until they replace it.

  • Network gear in the cupboard, or wherever it is located at your place – routers, powered network switches, etc. If the network gear blows up, you will lose the network around your premises.

  • Phones – while they are not as mission-critical as your ONT and network gear, it’s still annoying when they get fried.


  • UPS or Uninterruptible Power Supply

    An uninterruptible power supply (UPS) is an electrical apparatus that provides emergency power when the mains power fails.

  • Critical pieces of IT hardware, such as servers, key computers and network storage devices, should normally have a UPS between them and the wall power supply

  • The UPS does more than a simple surge protector, but they do also provide some surge protection.

  • This article does not cover UPS devices, but do make sure that they are regularly checked and batteries replaced.


  • Unplug IT from the wall

  • This can be difficult to achieve as computer equipment is often in use. If you are concerned enough about an approaching storm, then consider properly turning it off and then physically removing the plug from the wall.

  • If in any doubt – ALWAYS check with your IT Alliance partner first, as some IT equipment should not be unplugged.


  • Last thoughts

  • If the surge protector has experienced a significant power surge, or a lightning strike, it may have done its job and no longer work. Replace it. Often they will have a little light which indicates they are working, so if the light goes out – probably time to replace.

  • Don’t use the very cheapest devices and expect them to protect you.


  • In summary

    Thunderstorms and lightning are real threats to IT and can cause not just cost, but also disruptions to your business. Surge protectors can last for years and all your IT equipment should use them.

    While surge protectors can last for years, it pays to keep a close eye on them and replace them if needed.

    If you need help making sure your IT is protected against weather events contact an IT Alliance member .


    IT Alliance Members:

    CT Business Solutions | Hamilton | Morrinsville | Matamata-Piako | North Waikato
    @Computer | Northland | Kerikeri | Whangarei
    IT Live | Auckland
    Technology Partners | Tauranga
    Vision Lab | Te Puke
    AdvancedIT | Rotorua | South Waikato
    BlackSANZ | New Plymouth | Taranaki
    GTB | Wellington | Kapiti
    Decision1 IT Solutions | Dunedin | Otago
    IT Centre | Wanaka | South Otago
    Voicecom | Invercargill | Southland



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